Why Have a Funeral?

By: Andrea Ruggieri
Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Why Have a Funeral?

We are often asked the question, “why should my family have a funeral?” Many times this is followed up with a statement like, “it will be easier to do nothing.” American death rituals have changed, the trend moving toward “less is more.”

Our funeral home believes you should think carefully and give the needed attention to this important transition in life. Being immersed in the business of funeral care has repeatedly shown us that when someone dies, surviving family and friends have an innate need to come together and support one another. To effectively acknowledge the passing of your loved one and the help grieve that loss, this universal need should not be ignored.

Consider the last time someone close to you died-  What did you feel?   What ran through your mind?    What actions seemed appropriate?   Did you want to reach out to others to express your own grief or console someone for theirs? Chances are, you had a social need to be with, or speak to others.

Dr. Alan Wolfelt, Death Educator and Grief Counselor, delves deeper into the topic. He addresses the questions, Why Is the funeral ritual important? and, What can a funeral do to help you, as a survivor? Understand how an authentic funeral helps to meet the reconciliation needs of mourning. Take time to read his thoughts, we are certain you’ll be glad that you did.

http://griefwords.com/index.cgi?action=page&page=articles%2Fritual.html&site_id=3

 

Leave a comment
Name*:
Email:
Comment*:
Please enter the letters you see in the image.

Comments

Please wait

Previous Posts

Staff Spotlight: Rocky Perotto, Therapy Dog - A Furry, Gentle Soul

It was a sunny June day in 2015 when Mike Perotto, President of Bartolomeo & Perotto showed up to our daily morning meeting with a jubilant, blonde fluffball of fur at his side announcing that ...

The Art of Balance with Grief

“The need of mourning requires us to embrace the pain of our loss—is something we naturally don’t want to do.  It is easier to avoid, repress, or deny the pain of grief than it is to confront ...

STAFF SPOTLIGHT: Carina DiFrancesco, Funeral Director with a Twist

Funeral Director: spunky, colorful, vibrant…  funny? Is this possible? Yes! Carina DiFrancesco carries a sense of humor that will send you rolling off your chair with laughter!  She joine...

A Child's Grief

Grief is complicated, messy, confusing, and painful. It is hard enough for us to understand grief within ourselves. It is often even more difficult to know how to support children through their gri...

Dave Perotto, Horticulturalist & Funeral Director

Funeral Director and Vice President of Bartolomeo & Perotto Funeral Home, Inc., Dave Perotto, “The younger, better looking brother…” I recall this quippy one-liner on the day I met Dave with hi...

STAFF SPOTLIGHT - Jim LiVecchi, Maintenance Director - Coach, Teacher, Dad

My history goes way back with the Perotto family, as far back as grammar school. Because of this, the funeral home was on my radar for as long as I can remember and I’ve always respected all that g...

Viewing the Deceased

The tradition of a wake The rituals and ceremonies surrounding death serve important functions. Since the beginning of human history, we have marked death with a vast variety of rituals and ceremo...

Bartolomeo & Perotto Examines Going “Green” In the Funeral Industry

While “going green” has been part of the American mainstream for at least the past three decades, the idea of “going green” as part and parcel of the funeral business has only recently begun to mak...

Hospice - The Anticipation of Grief

Death is not always sudden. When a loved one has a serious or terminal illness, it can seem like you are watching them fade away right before your eyes. An extended illness often provides loved one...

STAFF SPOTLIGHT: Joe Capuano, Funeral Director - Small, but Mighty

Before we dive deep into the history of Joe Capuano, here’s a little “Joe Trivia:”  Why the photo banner showcasing skateboarding? Many years ago, Joe decided at his daughter’s birthday party ...